10 best and worst states for healthcare

From Becker’s:

To identify the best and worst states for healthcare, WalletHub analysts compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia on 35 key metrics of healthcare cost, accessibility and outcomes. The metrics range from physicians per capita to average monthly insurance premium. Each measure was graded on a 100-point scale, with 100 representing the best healthcare at the most reasonable cost.

Here are the 10 best states for healthcare based on the analysis.

1. Hawaii — score of 67.36 out of 100
2. Iowa — 66.62
2. Minnesota — 66.62
4. New Hampshire — 65.54

OIG Updates FY 2017 Work Plan to Include Review of Medicare Claims for Telehealth Services Provided to Rural Beneficiaries: Will Substantive Change to Medicare Reimbursement for Telehealth Follow?

From the National Law Review:

In this most recent set of updates to the FY 2017 Work Plan, OIG announced that it will conduct a review of Medicare claims paid for telehealth services in FY 2017. Specifically, OIG is interested in reviewing claims for telehealth services provided at “distant sites” (i.e., the location of the provider of the telehealth service) that do not correspond with claims from an “originating site” (i.e., the location of the patient). By undertaking this review, presumably OIG seeks to verify that providers of telehealth services are: (1) appropriately rendering these services to Medicare beneficiaries based on current reimbursement rules under Medicare for provision of telehealth services (i.e., the beneficiary is at a valid originating site when receiving the telehealth service, which under current Medicare rules does not include a beneficiary’s home), and (2) not submitting fraudulent claims for telehealth services (i.e., services delivered outside of Medicare’s coverage and reimbursement scope). OIG’s review of these claims may demonstrate the need to update Medicare’s outdated coverage and reimbursement provisions for telehealth services.

Study: Doctors from elite schools prescribe fewer opioids

From Axios:

In a paper published Monday with the National Bureau of Economic Research, Princeton economists Molly Schnell and Janet Currie find a “striking relationship” between the frequency of prescriptions and medical school attended: doctors trained at top-ranked medical schools like Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Penn, Stanford and Washington University in St. Louis “are less likely to write any opioid prescriptions,” they write. And such doctors who doprescribe opiates do so at a lower rate than the typical MD.