The Telemedicine Stroke Network

From Dayton Business Journal:

Officials say a technology introduced to treat stroke patients at the hospitals of Premier Health Partners is the first step in what could be a new paradigm in personnel management.

The hospital network has announced new software that allows doctors to remotely access the emergency room to see a patient and direct care. The Telemedicine Stroke Network, as it is called, will be introduced in the neurology and oncology department at Premier’s four hospitals, but may be expanded to other areas of critical care, said Miami Valley Hospital spokesperson Nancy Thickel.

Man Dies Taking Wife To Hospital

From WWNY:

A Malone man died late Saturday night while trying to get his wife to the emergency room, according to Lewis County Sheriff’s deputies.

Sam E. Demo, 57, was driving the couple’s car on Effley Falls Road in the Town of Croghan just before midnight. Deputies said he was trying to get wife, Kathi Demo, 54, to the emergency room for treatment of a medical emergency.

Deputies said he lost control of his car and went off the road; it overturned three times and as it rolled over, Sam Demo was thrown from the vehicle.

Press Release: Oklahoma Medical Board Pioneers Use of QR Codes for Licensees

Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision (Medical Board) is the first in the nation to incorporate QR (quick response) codes on the medical licenses of physicians and other medical professionals. The ubiquitous black and white square box will now appear in the lower right hand corner of all newly issued or renewed physician licenses in Oklahoma.

“Law enforcement or emergency medical personnel establishing an incident command system at the scene of an accident or emergency will be able to immediately identify and confirm that the Good Samaritan offering assistance is indeed a licensed medical doctor”

In the same way that traditional UPC bar codes changed the way we pay for groceries, this use of QR Codes can allow for a rapid check-in of medical professionals at training events, clinics and hospitals.

“Law enforcement or emergency medical personnel establishing an incident command system at the scene of an accident or emergency will be able to immediately identify and confirm that the Good Samaritan offering assistance is indeed a licensed medical doctor,” said Board Deputy Executive Director, Reji Varghese.

Scanning the code will provide direct, instant access to a physician’s information page as it appears on the Board’s website,http://www.okmedicalboard.org. Some of the data available includes the doctor’s education, medical specialty and board certification, office address, telephone and office hours, hospital privileges, insurance participation and board status.

The online service is a product of a partnership between the Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision (Medical Board) and OK.gov, Oklahoma’s Official Website managed by the eGovernment firm, NIC Inc. (Nasdaq: EGOV).

About Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision

The mission of the Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision is to promote the Health, Safety and Well-being of the citizens (patients) of Oklahoma by requiring a high level of qualifications, standards and continuing education for licenses regulated by Oklahoma Medical Board. To protect the on-going Health Safety and Well-being of the citizens (patients) of Oklahoma by investigating complaints, conducting public hearings, effectuating and monitoring disciplinary actions against any of the licensed professionals, while providing the licensee with proper due process and all rights afforded under the law. To provide any member of society upon request, a copy of the specific public records and information on any of the licensed professionals.

About OK.gov

OK.gov is the official website of the state of Oklahoma and a collaborative effort between the Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services (OMES) and Oklahoma Interactive, LLC to help Oklahoma government entities Web-enable their information services. OMES is responsible for OK.gov. Oklahoma Interactive operates, maintains, and markets OK.gov and is part of eGovernment firm NIC’s (NASDAQ: EGOV) family of companies.

About NIC

NIC Inc. (NASDAQ: EGOV) is the nation’s leading provider of official government portals, online services, and secure payment processing solutions. The company’s innovativeeGovernment services help reduce costs and increase efficiencies for government agencies, citizens, and businesses across the country. NIC provides eGovernment solutions for more than 3,500 federal, state, and local agencies in the United States. Additional information is available at http://www.egov.com.

Hospital system kills controversial ‘Cheat Death’ slogan

From Fierce Healthcare:

…on Saturday, CaroMont CEO Randall L. Kelley emailed Gaston County commissioners saying the organization was “taking a step back” from the tagline, noting its goal to improve community health “cannot be sacrificed for a two-word-tagline,” the Gaston Gazette reported.

The next day, CaroMont issued a second statement reiterating it was pulling the tagline.

“Our intent was never to offend or incite,” CaroMont said in the statement. “We needed a way to get the issue of health care and the seriousness of the situation on the lips of every man, woman and child in the county,” the health system said, adding the controversy “successfully accomplished that goal.”

Does Providing Prescription Information or Services Improve Medication Adherence Among Patients Discharged From the Emergency Department? Read more: http://www.mdlinx.com/emergency-medicine/news-article.cfm/4556759/emergency-department#ixzz2Pt1xXA2E

From the Annals of Emergency Medicine:

Study objective

We determine whether prescription information or services improve the medication adherence of emergency department (ED) patients.

Methods

Adult patients treated at one of 3 EDs between November 2010 and September 2011 and prescribed an antibiotic, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, cardiac, or respiratory drug at discharge were eligible. Subjects were randomly assigned to usual care or one of 3 prescription information or services intervention groups: (1) practical services to reduce barriers to prescription filling (practical prescription information or services); (2) consumer drug information from MedlinePlus (MedlinePlus prescription information or services); or (3) both services and information (combination prescription information or services). Self-reported medication adherence, measured by primary adherence (prescription filling) and persistence (receiving medicine as prescribed) rates, was determined during a telephone interview 1 week postdischarge.

Results

Of the 3,940 subjects enrolled and randomly allocated to treatment, 86% (N=3,386) completed the follow-up interview. Overall, primary adherence was 88% and persistence was 48%. Across the sites, primary adherence and persistence did not differ significantly between usual care and the prescription information or services groups. However, at site C, subjects who received the practical prescription information or services (odds ratio [OR]=2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4 to 4.3) or combination prescription information or services (OR=1.8; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1) were more likely to fill their prescription compared with usual care. Among subjects prescribed a drug that treats an underlying condition, subjects who received the practical prescription information or services were more likely to fill their prescription (OR=1.8; 95% CI 1.0 to 3.1) compared with subjects who received usual care.

Conclusion

Prescription filling and receiving medications as prescribed was not meaningfully improved by offering patients patient-centered prescription information and services.

Doctors driven to bankruptcy

From CNNMoney:

As many doctors struggle to keep their practices financially sound,some are buckling under money woes and being pushed into bankruptcy.

It’s a trend that’s accelerated in recent years, industry experts say, with potentially serious consequences for doctors and patients. Some physicians are still able to keep practicing after bankruptcy, but for others, it’s a career-ending event. And when a practice shuts its doors, patients can find it harder to get the health care they need nearby.