ACEP Recognizes Excellence in Emergency Medicine

Press Release:

LAS VEGAS  — The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) last week recognized physicians for outstanding contributions to emergency medicine during the organization’s annual meeting in Las Vegas — ACEP16 Scientific Assembly — the largest gathering of emergency physicians in the country.  The awards honor excellence across a wide range of activities, including leadership, policy, education, advocacy and research.

The following are the awards:

John G. Wiegenstein Leadership Award

Col. (Ret.) Linda Lawrence, MD, CPE, FACEP, a former president of ACEP and executive vice president of U.S. Acute Care Solutions in Ohio, received ACEP’s highest honor, the John G. Wiegenstein Leadership Award, named for a founding member and first president of ACEP.  She was recognized for her years of extraordinary leadership in emergency medicine.

A recognized academician and clinician, Dr. Lawrence has served more than 24 years as an emergency physician and physician executive in the United States Air Force.  Her career highlights include roles as associate professor and commandant, Uniformed Services University School of Medicine; chief medical officer at David Grant Medical Center; chief of the department of emergency medicine at Wilford Hall Medical Center; Air Force Medical Service chief consultant for emergency medicine; deployed deputy hospital commander in Balad, Iraq; hospital commander (CEO) at Aviano Air Base in Italy; director of healthcare operations for the Air Force Medical Support Agency; and most recently, special assistant to surgeon general of the Air Force for Trusted Care Transformation. She received her medical degree at Temple University and completed her emergency medicine residency at Geisinger Medical Center.

As a leader in ACEP, she served on the Board of Directors from 2002-2009 and was elected to every office culminating as President and then Chair of the Board.  Her legacy as President was her ability to set focus and propel the organization into national media spotlight and strengthen advocacy.

James D. Mills Outstanding Contribution to Emergency Medicine Award

Lewis R. Goldfrank, MD, FACEP, former chief emergency medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York and former chair of emergency medicine at New York University (NYU) School of Medicine, received the James D. Mills Outstanding Contribution to Emergency Medicine Award, named for the second president of ACEP and organizer of the Alexandria Plan for full-time emergency department staffing and management.

Dr. Goldfrank is the Herbert W. Adams professor of the Ronald O. Perelman department of emergency medicine at New York University.  He is also medical director for New York City Health Department’s Poison Center.

Dr. Goldfrank’s efforts led to the development of NYU’s emergency medicine and medical toxicology residency programs.  He served as chair of the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s subboard on medical toxicology, the American Board of Medical Toxicology and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.  His career has been dedidated to working in the public hospitals of New York City emphasizing the role of emergency medicine in improving access to care, public health, public policy and medical humanism.

Dr Goldfrank was educated at Clark University, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the University of Brussels, Belgium, and is senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxicology. Dr. Goldfrank is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Outstanding Contribution in Education Award

James R. Roberts, MD, FACEP, FACMT, FAAEM, of Newtown Square, Pa., received the Outstanding Contribution in Education Award for his teaching excellence in emergency medicine.  Dr. Roberts is professor of emergency medicine at the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; senior consultant in medical toxicology at Drexel; and director of medical toxicology at The Mercy Catholic Medical Center.

After 26 years, he recently stepped down as vice chair of emergency medicine at Drexel, and chair of emergency medicine at Mercy Catholic Medical Center.  Dr. Roberts is a certified Medical Review Officer and a a fellow in ACEP (life time), AAEM, and ACMT (American College of Medical Toxicology). He is board certified in emergency medicine (ABME/ABMS) and medical toxicology (ABMT).

Dr. Roberts has served as faculty at The University of Cincinnati Medical Center and The New Mexico School of Medicine. He has established two fellowship training programs in medical toxicology, trained more than 30 toxicologistsand served as medical director of the New Mexico EMS academy. Dr. Roberts has been a guest speaker at invited grand rounds for more than 50 university medical centers and published over 80 peer reviewed articles in numerous journals, contributed chapters in 16 medical textbooks, as well as being senior editor of five textbooks, including the Roberts & Hedges, Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine, currently producing the seventh edition.

Dr. Roberts attended Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania (cum laude) and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He graduated from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and completed a residency in emergency medicine at The Medical College of Pennsylvania and a fellowship in medical toxicology at New York University/Bellevue Hospital (McNeil Scholar).

Outstanding Contribution in Research Award

Carlos A. Camargo, Jr., MD, DrPH, FACEP , of Boston, Mass., received ACEP’s Outstanding Contribution in Research Award for his leading research primarily in the areas of respiratory/allergy diseases.  Dr. Camargo is Professor of Emergency Medicine and Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the Conn Chair in Emergency Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital – all in Boston.

Dr. Camargo founded and directs the Emergency Medicine Network (EMNet), an international research collaboration with more than 230 hospitals. EMNet focuses on respiratory/allergy emergencies, emergency care health policy, and other public health issues.  Dr.Camargo’s research also focuses on nutrition and respiratory/allergy disorders in large cohort studies and in randomized controlled trials.

Carlos is past president of the American College of Epidemiology and has served on many national committees, including the 2005 US dietary guidelines, 2007 NIH asthma guidelines, and 2010 NIH food allergy guidelines. He has more than 750 publications.

Dr. Camargo received his BA from Stanford University; MPH from U.C. Berkeley; MD from U.C. San Francisco; and DrPH from Harvard School of Public Health.  He completed his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, and research fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Outstanding Contribution in EMS Award

Jullette M. Saussy, MD, FACEP, of Alexandria, Va., received ACEP’s Outstanding Contribution in EMS Award for her work as an emergency physician, educator, EMS medical director and EMT.  She currently works clinically in a critical access hospital in Virginia with Riverside Physicians Group.

Dr. Saussy’s love for and experience in prehospital emergency medicine spanned 35 years and includes serving as EMS medical director for the New Orleans Fire Department, director and medical director for New Orleans EMS, and chief medical officer for the City of New Orleans Homeland Security Office.   Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans August 2005, just eight months after she took over the troubled system.  Serving the City before, during, and after Katrina remains one of her greatest career challenges, but also one of her greatest joys.

In 2007, Dr. Saussy was diagnosed with an aggressive form of uterine cancer that metastasized to her lungs, and she spent 2007-2008 battling this disease. Blessed with an amazing team, she was able to continue to work, traveling weekly to and from Texas for treatment. In 2010, she resigned and practiced emergency medicine full-time as an asssistant clinical professor of emergency medicine at LSU until joining Vidacare/Teleflex and working as one of the medical directors of Global Clinical and Medical Affairs.

In July of 2015, Dr. Saussy began serving as EMS medical director and assistant fire chief for Washington, DC Fire and EMS. With promises from the fire department, the Deputy Mayor of Public Safety and the Mayor, she was poised to reform a system plagued for years of controversy and intrinsic shortfalls that affected quality patient care. However, facing many challenges to reform, Dr. Saussy resigned in February 2016.  Dr. Saussy attended Tulane University and graduated from medical school at LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans.  She completed her emergency medicine residency at Charity Hospital in New Orleans with LSA Emergency Medicine.

Colin C. Rorrie, Jr., PhD Award for Excellence in Health Policy

Marilyn J. Heine, MD, FACP, FACEP, FFSMB, FCPP of Dresher, Pa., received the Colin C. Rorrie, Jr., PhD Award for her career dedicated to advocating on behalf of the medical profession nationwide and in her home state of Pennsylvania.  The award is named for ACEP’s executive director who served the organization from 1982 to 2003.  Dr. Heine is an internal medicine physician who practices emergency medicine and hematology oncology.

Dr. Heine is a member of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Legislation and previously served on the AMPAC Board of Directors where she chaired the AMPAC Committee on Political Education and Communication.  She is a member of the Pennsylvania Medical Society (PAMED) delegation to the AMA House of Delegates.  Prior to her presidency of PAMED from 2011-2012, Dr. Heine chaired PAMED’s Executive Council on Political Advocacy and the PAMPAC Board of Directors.  She served on PAMED’s Council on Membership, Commission on Women Physicians, and tort reform priority workgroup.

Dr. Heine also has served in prominent positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). She chaired ACEP’s Federal Government Affairs Committee, has been a member of ACEP’s Council and its leadership committees, served on ACEP’s Advisory Group to the President, and is a member of the Quality and Performance and State Legislative and Regulatory committees.  Dr. Heine was president of the Pennsylvania College of Emergency Physicians, chaired its Governmental Affairs Committee, and secured a Congressional grant administered through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study issues that affect emergency medicine in Pennsylvania.

Dr. Heine has testified before Congress and the Pennsylvania General Assembly.  Governor Rendell appointed her to serve on the Commonwealth Health Care Reform Implementation Advisory Committee.  In 2013, Dr. Heine was appointed by Governor Corbett to the State Board of Medicine, where she is vice chair.  Dr. Heine is a graduate of ACEP’s School for Political Advocacy, AMPAC’s Campaign School and Candidate Workshop, and the Physicians Foundation Leadership Academy at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.  Since 2000 Dr. Heine has organized and chaired a physicians’ advisory board for the Congressman from Pennsylvania’s 8thdistrict, and has chaired physician coalitions for pro-physician candidates from both major parties at the state and federal level.

Dr. Heine graduated from Brandeis University and earned her medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey-Rutgers Medical School.  In addition, she served in the Public Health Service’s Commissioned Officer Student Training and Extern Program at NIH and a subinternship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and completed her internship and residency in internal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia.

John A. Rupke Legacy Award

Kathleen Cowling, DO, MS, FACEP, of Saginaw, Mich.,has received the John A. Rupke Legacy Award for her lifelong commitment to ACEP and the Michigan chapter.  Dr. Cowling is the residency program director at the Central Michigan University College of Medicine and practices clinically at Covenant HealthCare.

Dr. Cowling taught for two decades as core faculty at CMU before taking on the role as residency program director in 2015.  Over this time, Dr. Cowling became increasingly active in th Michigan chapter of ACEP and advocating on behalf of emergency medicine as “the best job that there is.”  She began work with the state chapter on the education committee before becoming a member of the board of directors and finally Chapter President.

Dr. Cowling later became involved with service in national ACEP, being elected to the ACEP Board in 2005.  Encouraged by her state chapter after serving as President, she decided to aim for higher service in the College and was elected to the ACEP Board in 2005.

Dr. Cowling has been advocating for EM either by hosting tours for Congressmen in her emergency department at Covenant HealthCare where she still practices clinically, or mentoring residents and taking them to meet Senators in DC during Leadership and advocacy.  Because of her dedication to making EM better, the Michigan chapter has bestowed their highest awards, the Ron Krome and Legacy awards for her service to the chapter.  The Medical Staff at Covenant has also given her the most outstanding physician award for her service to the hospital.

Dr. Cowling attended Michigan State University and earned her medical degree from the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine.  She completed her residency at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Mich.  Dr. Cowling has begun work in an MBA program and hopes to complete her degree in 2017.

Honorary Membership Awards

Barb Burgess, of the ACEP Colorado Chapter, was given an Honorary Membership Award.  Barb has been the Chapter executive director since 1995.  Prior to coming to ACEP, Ms. Burgess was with the State of Colorado EMS Division and Aurora Presbyterian Hospital (EMS Education) and then executive director for Colorado Advanced Life Support.

Beth B. Brunner, MBA, CAE, of the Florida Chapter of ACEP (FCEP) was also honored with an Honorary Membership Award.  Ms. Brunner is the executive director of FCEP and CEO of the Florida Emergency Medicine Foundation, located in the Emergency Medicine Learning and Resource Center in Orlando, Florida.  Ms. Brunner joined FCEP in 1986.  She was instrumental in creating the Florida Emergenct Medicine Foundation in 1990.  Ms. Brunner earned her MBA from the University of Central Florida, and has earned her Certified Association (CAE) designation.

ACEP is the national medical specialty society representing emergency medicine. ACEP is committed to advancing emergency care through continuing education, research and public education. Headquartered in Dallas, Texas, ACEP has 53 chapters representing each state, as well as Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. A Government Services Chapter represents emergency physicians employed by military branches and other government agencies.

Man arrested in Sioux City after urinating in emergency room sink

From Siouxland Matters:

According to court documents, Richard Mackey had asked to be transported to the hospital following a disturbance. Authorities say when he arrived he refused treatment and became belligerent with hospital staff.

When officers arrived, they found him urinating in an emergency room sink. Police say that Mackey was unable to maintain his balance and had slurred speech.


Video consultations reduce number of patients leaving prison for healthcare

From the Crack (yeah, I didn’t make that up):

Innovative video consultations already piloted in Millom are being extended to Haverigg prison. The aim of the project is to reduce the number of journeys from the prison to the nearest Accident and Emergency Department at Furness General Hospital, which is a 45 minute drive away.

Haverigg Prison is a Category C men’s prison, located in the village of Haverigg in Cumbria, which generates an increasing number of journeys each year to Furness General Hospital Emergency Department.

The scheme, which is currently being piloted by University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust and Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, as part of Better Care Together, involves a high definition video camera and monitor located in one of the consulting rooms within the Health Care Centre at Haverigg Prison. There is similar equipment within the Emergency Department (ED) at Furness General Hospital which allows a senior doctor to virtually assess the prison based patient and triage their follow on care.

Babies should sleep in parents’ room to help prevent SIDS

From Reuters:

Infants should sleep in the same bedroom as their parents for at least the first six months of their lives to minimize the risk of sleep-related deaths, according to new guidelines from U.S. pediatricians.

Ideally, babies should stay in their parents’ room at night for a full year, according to recommendations released today by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Rural hospitals out-perform urban hospitals on key quality measures

From Healthcare Dive:

  • Rural hospitals, on average, outdid their urban counterparts in Medicare’s value-based purchasing program, scoring higher on several key measures, according to a new HHS report.
  • The program rewards or penalizes acute care hospitals based on the quality of care they provide to patients and hospitals in rural areas bested urban hospitals on patient experience as well as efficiency and costs.
  • The higher total performance score rural hospitals had translated to a higher average payment, with an average payment adjustment factor of +0.22 of diagnosis-related group payments, versus +0.07 for urban hospitals.

Emergency Medicine prof. likens state of ER geriatric care to “cruise ship medicine”

From MedCity News:

Although the rising senior population is widely acknowledged, the need to change  geriatric care in emergency rooms in light of the “silver tsunami” is not. Seniors generally have more complex conditions than the typical emergency room patient, posing challenges for ER staff. Add dementia to the equation and their visit may be a troubling sign that a family caregiver is overwhelmed and can no longer manage.

The ER has been at the crossroads of acute care and population health for some time, but the current state of geriatric care in hospital emergency rooms is no better than “cruise ship medicine,” according to University of California San Diego emergency medicine professor Dr. Ted Chan. He highlighted some of the ways hospitals are trying to change that in a fireside chat at the MedCity ENGAGE conference in San Diego this week.

Car ‘deliberately’ driven into Emergency Department

From ABC:

Staff and patients at a hospital in Melbourne’s west have escaped uninjured after a man allegedly deliberately rammed his car into the emergency department.